Maastricht University (2012). Strategic Programme 2012-2016. Inspired by Quality

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Inspired by Quality

Preface

This document presents Maastricht University’s strategic programme, entitled ‘Inspired by quality’, for 2012 - 2016. It builds both on the core mission of our university and on the strategic developments that have been implemented in previous years. But foremost it will present the innovative plans for the future next to the processes that we have already initiated. New steps will be taken wherever needed to ensure that the university can further strengthen its position as an attractive, high-quality institution with consistently strong national and international performance. Maastricht University’s core mission and strategic developments for the 2012 - 2016 period:
  • We are a Dutch university with a foundation in the Province of Limburg and a particular role for the south of Netherlands and its neighbours in the Euregion. By joining forces with the Province of Limburg, the cities and the private and economic sector, we will be a leader in the economic, societal, demographic and infrastructural development of this region. {Regionale samenwerking{60
  • We are and will continue to be the most international university in the Netherlands, making our students fit for the challenges of the European and global knowledge society. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{28
  • We will be a true network university, linking and collaborating with other knowledge institutions, regionally, nationally and internationally. {Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen{18
  • We will continue to be an innovator in the educative process, building upon our motto ‘leading in learning’ and combining it with socially relevant, focused research.
  • As a research university based on educational excellence, we will be the gateway for international mobility of knowledge, students and staff to the Netherlands. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{24
  • We will be a bastion for openness, freedom of thought and freedom of speech, as well as a leader in the fight for justice.

Summary

In its 36 years of existence, Maastricht University has come a long way. From its grass-roots beginning to establishing the eighth medical faculty in the Netherlands, Maastricht University has grown into a good-sized, broad university with a profile that is unique in the Netherlands and Europe, based on both its educational and research approaches. Maastricht University now has more than 15,000 students and almost 37,000 graduates. We offer 17 bachelor’s programmes and 56 master’s programmes at six faculties: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, School of Business and Economics, Faculty of Health, Medicine, and Life Sciences, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Humanities and Sciences, and Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience. Research is conducted at the highest level and is traditionally thematic, multidisciplinary and inspired by societal themes. {Valorisatie{17 In close collaboration with the Maastricht UMC+ and the Province of Limburg, we are an important actor in the regional economy by continuously bringing innovation to the economic structure of the region. {Regionale samenwerking{32 Altogether, Maastricht University and the Maastricht UMC+ have 9,000 employees with a turnover of €800 million. Our profile consists of three clear characteristics: Problem-Based Learning (PBL) and innovation in education; international orientation based on firm roots in the Netherlands, Limburg and the Euregion; and an integrated, multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to research and education. These characteristics, which are our main strengths, are reflected in all university activities.

Our geographic location defines our identity and the south of Limburg is an inherently international region. We share natural linkages and a long history with the Aachen, Liege and Hasselt areas, which make us a culturally aligned Euregion. Belgium and Germany border the Netherlands and trade ads up to €68 billion a year, which makes both countries extremely important to the Dutch economy. The free flow of people within the European Union is an essential element that further strengthens the economies of European countries and the Netherlands in particular. Our geographic position allows us to be a frontrunner in the process of European unification. Our Euregion exemplifies what the process of unification may create, regardless of the institutional form of unification that will emerge. Our region has already encountered many of the challenges that the unification processes created and this makes the Limburg-Liege-Aachen area a unique test bed where the European challenges of the near future can be studied in advance. Indeed, we firmly believe that our future is Europe and that Maastricht University, together with our Euregional partners, can help in preparing our own future by focusing on the Euregion.

Our institutional foundations are in the Netherlands. Maastricht University is a Dutch university, publicly financed and hence expected to contribute to the educational, societal and economic needs of the country. This does not contradict our allegiance to our Euregional profile. Given the Dutch economy’s dependence on international trade and economic developments, we are convinced that our inherently international focus is a crucial contribution to Dutch well-being in the future, near and far.

Though the world does not stop at the borders of the European Union, or Europe for that matter, we maintain our point of view that Europe is, or should be, an important player on the global stage. We cannot neglect the facts that balances in the global domain are shifting, with new countries emerging such as the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China), Turkey and Indonesia. The 21st century may be an Asian century and this will pose serious questions about the relationship that Europe, as an entity and also as a collection of independent countries, should maintain with Asia. Africa is a key area where this development will become apparent and where it is already very clear that Asian countries have started playing larger roles. We cannot address all the world’s issues, but we will never neglect the fact that as a truly international university we should be aware of such global developments. Similarly regions need to be aware of their positions in a globalising world. Regional economic prosperity will depend upon the degree to which regions adapt to a diverse institutional presence; only then can regions harness the forces of globalisation to their own ends. {Opkomende economieen{198

This awareness of the importance of global developments for the EU is reflected in the design of the new EU framework programme ‘Horizon 2020’, which has a €80 billion budget. This programme will introduce new strategies for research and innovation that will contribute to solutions for the grand societal challenges we face. We, Europe’s universities and research institutions, are seen as key providers of the cutting-edge knowledge needed to spur innovation. {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{71

On the national level, the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science developed a new strategy for higher education, formulated in the strategic agenda ‘Kwaliteit in verscheidenheid’. In order to make Dutch higher education future-proof for 2025, radical shifts in direction need to be achieved: a stricter study climate, reorganisation of the curriculum, collaboration in the knowledge chain from fundamental research to practice-oriented research and applied research and innovation, and profiling and specialisation of institutions. In parallel and in tune with the new strategy in higher education, the Ministry of Economy, Agriculture and Innovation developed their new strategy called ‘Naar de top’. In this strategy, the ministry defined nine top sectors: High-Tech Systems and Materials, Energy, Creative Industry, Logistics, Agriculture and Food, Horticulture, Life Sciences and Health, Water, and Chemistry. These nine top sectors are knowledge intensive, export-oriented and should also contribute significantly toward solving major societal problems. {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{73

A joint strategy called Brainport 2020 has been developed in the southeast of the Netherlands, with the goal of making the Dutch economy one of the world’s top five economies. The strength of the region lies in High-Tech Systems and Materials, Food, Automotive, Life-Tech/Health and Design and New Chemistry. In our own region, Limburg, covenants and agreements have created joint strategies with the Maastricht UMC+ and government authorities such as the Province of Limburg and municipalities of Maastricht, Heerlen, Sittard-Geleen and Venlo. In a Euregional context, joint collaborations have been set up with Hasselt, Liege and Aachen (supported and financed by the Structural Funds in collaboration with the Euregion Meuse-Rhine partners). These covenants and collaborations allow for the development of large initiatives and campuses that boost the Euregional economy substantially, now and in the future. {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{135

In the context of these impactful developments, Maastricht University will continue to formulate answers taking our defining characteristics as points of departure: PBL supported by ongoing innovation in education, a strong international focus and a multidisciplinary approach to both research and education. Building on this distinct profile, we strive to make a unique and outstanding contribution to the changing environment and societal context. The Leading in Learning programme will continue to act as a catalyst for continuous improvement of our educational efforts. Our continued goal for Maastricht University programmes is to acquire top positions in Dutch and European rankings. {Internationale concurrentiepositie{17 From 2011 onwards, we are starting to take steps to consolidate multidisciplinary research focused on three broad themes: Learning and Innovation, Quality of Life, and Europe and a Globalising World. These themes will be addressed in a differential manner, ranging from fundamental, curiosity-driven research to applied, innovation-oriented research. The aim is to contribute to solving ‘grand societal challenges’, that is, the societal problems addressed within the themes. The three central themes will be addressed across the university and together with our primary partners. They will be clustered in three central Maastricht University campus areas and satellites: the Maastricht Inner-City Campus, the Maastricht Health Campus, the Chemelot Campus, satellites in Venlo, and initiatives in Brussels and India. Both contract research and valorisation will be given a strong boost, not only to help the university reduce its dependence on declining government funding but also to address these grand societal challenges and expand into new markets. {Profilering en zwaartepuntvorming{153 With regard to national and international cooperation, Maastricht University continues to be an international network university. At the heart of our strategy is network formation based on complementarities, added value, mutual understanding and entrepreneurship. This will help us to cope with the ever-changing profiles and challenges of the international higher education landscape, creating a global network profile that is firmly rooted in the Netherlands and the Province of Limburg. {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{69

Therefore, our strategic programme will concisely discuss our future plans with regard to students and alumni, education, research, valorisation, staff, governance, operations and the international network university. Maastricht University will contribute to the challenges set for:
  • Students and alumni: We will strive for a differentiated and high-quality student population; we will teach people to make a valuable contribution to society with an eye for the context that they work in; and we will consider it our social responsibility to continually invest in a model that ensures that both the right students and the right alumni find themselves in the right place. {Valorisatie{65
  • Education: PBL remains a distinguishing feature for all study programmes; our programmes will appear at the top of Dutch rankings and in the top 10 in European rankings; we will further develop our international classroom and continue to innovate student-centred, collaborative learning in a small-scale, inspiring learning environment; and we will create educational innovation.
  • Research: We will conduct core research, which is among the best in the Netherlands and in Europe; {Internationale concurrentiepositie{16 we will strive for a further increase in both indirect government and third-party funding; {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{14 we will strengthen multidisciplinary, interfaculty research in three areas: Learning and Innovation, Quality of Life, and Europe and a Globalising World; {Profilering en zwaartepuntvorming{21 and we will strive to increase the number of PhD defences to more than 250 per year.
  • Valorisation: We will further develop major initiatives together with our partners in the Brainport 2020 area and the Euregion. These include, among others, the sciences on the Chemelot Campus, Brains Unlimited on the Maastricht Health Campus, initiatives on the Maastricht Inner-City Campus and campus satellites at, for example, Agro-food in Venlo; we will sustain or increase the number of spin-off companies; {Ondernemerschap{10 and we will develop a view and accompanying policies about societal valorisation.• Staff: Maastricht University will position itself as an attractive employer focused on attracting quality staff who reflect Maastricht University’s international character and further strengthen the academic community. {Personeelsbeleid{27
  • Governance: Maastricht University management is equally balanced between central strategy and decentralised responsibility. Education, research and service to society take place within faculties, under final responsibility of the deans. Targets will be formulated for those goals. These targets will form the framework for assessing the performance of the faculties and the university as a whole.
  • Operations: We will make operational processes as student-centred as possible; we will structure the supporting organisation in such a way that employees are enabled to optimally make use of one another’s competences; we will continue streamlining the supporting services, resulting in a ‘lean and friendly’ organisation; {Efficiency en effectiviteit{14 we will follow the ‘English-unless’ principle; we will improve management information; {Informatiemanagement{5 and we will renew the electronic working and learning environments. {Informatiemanagement{9
  • International Network University: We will reinforce internationalisation through our target country policy and other methods; we will join or initiate international and national network formation processes; we will strengthen regional cooperation and the regional economic structure; {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{21 and we will redefine our collaboration with the Maastricht Academic Hospital (azM) within the Maastricht UMC+.

Profile

Maastricht University’s profile consists of three clear characteristics:
  • Problem-based learning (PBL) supported by innovation in education
  • An international orientation based on firm roots in the Netherlands, Limburg and the Euregion
  • An integrated, multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach to research and education.
These characteristics are reflected in all university activities.

The educational opportunities offered by Maastricht University are unique, thanks to both the content of the study programmes and our PBL teaching model. PBL is characterised by small-scale, student-centred, activating and collaborative learning. Maastricht University provides education at a high academic level that responds to relevant societal issues. To this end, our study programmes focus on theoretical insights as well as on the application of these theoretical insights to practice, often from a multidisciplinary perspective. {Valorisatie{42 Students not only learn the content of their field, but also acquire competences in cooperation, leadership and research. Continual educational innovation is a core principle at Maastricht University and one that we constantly consider. External reviews and comparative surveys on national and international levels (for example, the Keuzegids Hoger Onderwijs, Elsevier and CHE) consistently rate Maastricht University study programmes as good to very good. Our degree completion rates are the highest in the Netherlands and our percentage of first-year bachelor’s dropouts is among the lowest. {Rendement en uitval{21 Maastricht University considers itself to be the international university of the Netherlands. Much of our education and research focuses on international and European themes: European Public Health, European Studies, European Law, Globalisation and Law, European Public Affairs, International Business and so on. As a bilingual university, virtually all teaching takes place in English. Almost 45% of our students and 30% of our academic staff come from abroad. Moreover, we have a sizable influx and outflow of exchange students: 934 incoming and 1,751 outgoing students in the 2009/10 academic year. All in all, over 100 different nationalities are represented at Maastricht University. The cultural diversity of our students and teaching staff greatly contributes to establishing our brand: the ‘international classroom’. Geographically, Maastricht University is ideally positioned to couple its international and European focus with a strong bond with the Province of Limburg and the surrounding Euregion. Maastricht University is an essential actor in the further development of the regional economy. This is reflected in, among other things, the joint UM/Maastricht UMC+ covenant drawn up with the Province of Limburg, focusing on developments in Maastricht and beyond, and reflected in our activities in Venlo and Chemelot.

Since the university’s founding, research and education at Maastricht University have been thematic, multidisciplinary and inspired by societal themes. Maastricht University is unique because our approach is focused on a set of thematic priorities that are studied in a truly interdisciplinary fashion Quality of Life, and Europe and a Globalising World. For instance, ‘Quality of Life’ takes an integrated approach in which select themes are studied from the molecular to societal level, incorporating cross-disciplinary perspectives. In addition, education and research at Maastricht University are not only closely connected but also reflect both our international orientation and our strong footing in the region. This can be seen in the university’s structural collaboration in international, national and regional partnerships, in which the valorisation of research results also plays an important role. {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{27 Together with the academic hospital Maastricht, Maastricht University is home to the only university medical centre in the southeast Netherlands, the Maastricht UMC+. In the Euregion, Maastricht University and the Maastricht UMC+ are joining efforts to collaborate with the universities of Aachen, Leuven, Liège and Hasselt, the Forschungszentrum Jülich and the Universitätsklinikum Aachen. Maastricht University and the Maastricht UMC+ participate in various top institutes such as BioMedical Materials, Food and Nutrition (TIFN), TI Pharma, the Centre for Molecular Medicine, the Parelsnoer Initiative and the Network for Studies on Pensions, Aging and Retirement (Netspar). {Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen{93 Maastricht University in cooperation with the Maastricht UMC+ is an active participant in Brainport 2020 and led the setup of the Chemelot Campus and the Maastricht Health Campus, which are important examples of public-private collaboration. {Samenwerking met bedrijfsleven{35 In Europe and internationally, Maastricht University coordinates and participates in over 100 collaborative projects funded by the European Commission programmes and National Institutes for Health. {Samenwerking met bedrijfsleven{25 Last but not least, Maastricht University pursues strong ties with small and medium enterprises, as evidenced in the University-Industry Research Cooperation (UIRC) Scoreboard recently published by Leiden University’s Centre for Science and Technology Studies. {Samenwerking met bedrijfsleven{34

Societal context

The societal context of Maastricht University starts with its region, which needs to be aware of its position in a globalising world. Regional economic prosperity will depend upon the degree to which regions adapt to a diverse institutional presence; only then can they harness the forces of globalisation to their own ends.

Our geographic location defines our identity and the south of Limburg is an inherently international region. We share natural linkages with the Aachen, Liege and Hasselt areas, which make us culturally aligned. Belgium and Germany border the Netherlands and trade ads up to €68 billion a year, which makes both countries extremely important to the Dutch economy. The free flow of people within the European Union is an essential element that further strengthens the economies of European countries and the Netherlands in particular. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{83

Our geographical position allows us to be a frontrunner in the process of European unification. It exemplifies what the process of unification may create, regardless of the institutional form of unification that will emerge. Our region has already encountered many of the challenges that the unification processes created, making the Limburg-Liege-Aachen area a unique test bed where the European challenges of the near future can be studied in advance. Indeed, we firmly believe that our future is Europe and that Maastricht University, together with our partners in this area, can help in preparing this future. Our institutional foundations are in the Netherlands. Maastricht University is a Dutch university, publicly financed and hence expected to contribute to the educational, societal and economic needs of the country. This does not contradict our allegiance to our Euregional profile. Given the Dutch economy’s dependence on international trade and economic developments, we are convinced that our inherently international focus will make a crucial contribution to Dutch well-being in the future, near and far. {Valorisatie{66

Though the world does not stop at the borders of the European Union, or Europe for that matter, we maintain our point of view that Europe is, or should be, an important player on the global stage. We cannot address all the world’s issues, but we will never neglect the fact that as a truly international university we should be aware of the global societal context and its developments.

Therefore Maastricht University should include in its strategy responses to the challenges and developments throughout our multiple regions, the Netherlands, the EU and the globe. In this chapter the societal context relevant for Maastricht University addresses these various developments and challenges.

Our multiple regions

In our own region, Limburg, covenants and agreements have created joint strategies with the Maastricht UMC+ and government authorities such as the Province of Limburg and the municipalities of Maastricht, Heerlen, Sittard-Geleen and Venlo. In a Euregional context, joint collaborations have been set up with Hasselt, Liege and Aachen (supported and financed by the Euregion Meuse-Rhine partners). These covenants and collaborations allow for the development of large initiatives and campuses that boost the regional economy enormously. Together with its regional partners and its partners across the border, Maastricht University is actively engaged in the triple helix initiatives that link knowledge to valorisation. {Regionale samenwerking{102 These are built around the ‘hotspots’ of the three university’s core campuses, all situated in the south of Limburg:
  • Chemelot Campus: This campus, along with the High Tech Campus Eindhoven, is one of only two campuses in the south-eastern Netherlands that the government has designated as being ‘of national importance’. On this campus, Maastricht University and the Maastricht UMC+ work with our contractual partners, DSM and the Province of Limburg, to create an entirely new and open innovation area focused on the interface between chemical engineering, advanced bio-organic chemistry and biobased performance materials. It also creates good opportunities for expansion in fields such as performance materials, biobased materials, biotechnology and biosynthesis, and technologies that enable research and development. These expansions will occur in close collaboration with the High Tech Campus Eindhoven and Limburg economic development (L.E.D.) initiatives. Last but not least, Maastricht University will be the coordinating partner in involving other knowledge institutions such as the RWTH Aachen and the Eindhoven University of Technology to bring initiatives to the Chemelot Campus. {Regionale samenwerking{152
  • Maastricht Health Campus: This campus is a unique setting where research is focused on health and well-being on different levels, from molecules to humans to societies. It is the site of two faculties, the Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience and the Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences. The latter faculty partners with the azM to form the Maastricht UMC+. This campus is home to the largest academic health science cluster in Europe, which serves the entire health continuum from top referral and top clinical care to prevention and rehabilitation. This is linked with an infrastructure for public health interventions, high-quality laboratories and clinical trial facilities, and a unique imaging platform. The research excels in four key areas: cardiovascular diseases, mental health and neurosciences, metabolic aspects of chronic diseases, and primary care and health sciences. As the only university medical centre in the Brainport region, the Maastricht UMC+ has a highly integrated research and care chain in these fields. Furthermore, the Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience has implemented an initiative in high field brain imaging called Brains Unlimited. Apart from its excellence in this field, the faculty has unique and outstanding research areas focusing, for example, on forensic and clinical psychology
  • Inner-City Campus: This area combines faculties with a strong alpha gamma focus whose research is directly focused on immediate societal issues. The School of Business and Economics, for example, is very active in this context through its researchers who participate in NETSPAR, societal research institutes such as ROA and UNU-MERIT and through the introduction of the service science factory concept. The Faculty of Humanities and Sciences hosts many innovative programmes such as the School of Governance, University College Maastricht and the new Maastricht Science Programme. In the Law Faculty, the research school on human rights and ius commune are well embedded in country-wide networks whereas the centres on transnational legal research and global legal issues provide a unique profile for Maastricht University. Last but not least, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, with its strong focus on European society, has recently been awarded a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence on European Administrative Governance grant.
  • Development of the sciences (which includes research and teaching in the Maastricht Science Programme and master’s programmes in Biobased Materials and Systems Biology) is a joint activity that contributes to both the structural reinforcement of the locations themselves and also to the linkage and integration of the Maastricht Health Campus with the Chemelot Campus.
The triple helix initiatives in Limburg and the Euregion around the Chemelot Campus, the Maastricht Health Campus and the Maastricht Inner-City Campus also form the specific input of Limburg in the Brainport 2020 strategy. ‘Brainport 2020: Top Economy, Smart Society’ is a vision and a strategy along with a tangible implementation programme that has been developed for the southeast of the Netherlands, of which Limburg is a part, and that can help make the Dutch economy one of the world’s top five economies. The strengthening of the region lies in High-Tech Systems and Materials, Food, Automotive, Life-Tech/ Health, Design and Chemistry. World players, multinationals and small and medium-sized enterprises with strong export positions in these sectors are all located in the southeast Netherlands. A top five spot can only be achieved if the knowledge economy of the southeast Netherlands has the opportunity to grow to a position in the top three of Europe’s top technology regions and in the top ten on a global scale. The southeast Netherlands is current number nine in Europe and number 13 in the world. According to this strategy, the following goals will be met by 2020 {Regionale samenwerking{158 :
  • The region’s annual contribution to the gross national product will have risen by €40 billion to €136 billion. {Regionale samenwerking{18
  • Economic growth in the southeast Netherlands will be around three percent, double our country’s average. {Regionale samenwerking{15
  • Three of our field labs will become world renowned as incubators of innovative solutions for home care, mobility and sustainable building.
  • The southeast Netherlands will be heading for near full employment. The job market needs everyone, from knowledge workers and highly-educated technicians to manual-skilled workers and craftsmen. {Regionale samenwerking{26
The Netherlands
On the national level, the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science developed a new strategy for higher education, formulated in the strategic agenda ‘Kwaliteit in verscheidenheid’. In order to make the Dutch higher education future-proof for 2025, the following radical shifts in direction need to be achieved:
  • a stricter study climate
  • reorganisation of the curriculum
  • collaboration in the knowledge chain from fundamental research to practice-oriented research, and applied research and innovation
  • profiling and specialisation of institutions
Concurrently the Ministry of Economy, Agriculture and Innovation developed their new strategy for societal development called ‘Naar de top’. In this strategy, the ministry defined nine top sectors:
  • High-Tech Systems and Materials
  • Energy
  • Creative Industry
  • Logistics
  • Agriculture and Food
  • Horticulture
  • Life Sciences and Health
  • Water
  • Chemistry
These nine top sectors are knowledge intensive, export-oriented and should also contribute significantly toward solving major societal problems. Entrepreneurs (from industry) and researchers (from universities and research institutions) in the nine top sectors have developed concrete proposals which will strengthen Dutch competitiveness. The available budget will be divided between these concrete proposals of public-private partnerships in the nine top sectors. These two political developments impact Maastricht University significantly as they shape the financial arrangements and possibilities.

The EU and the globe
An important globalisation trend is the rise of the BRIC countries, especially China, which impacts Europe’s structural relationships. The 21st century may be an Asian century and this will pose serious questions about the relationship that Europe, as an entity and also as a collection of independent countries, should maintain with Asia. Africa is a key area where this development will become apparent and where it is already very clear that Asian countries have started playing larger roles. In preparation for this new reality, the European Commission has created a new framework programme called Horizon 2020. This program, which will run from 2014 to 2020, employs new strategies and has an €80 billion budget for research and innovation. These new strategies will contribute to solutions for the grand societal challenges that we face, such as returning to growth and higher levels of employment; fighting climate change and moving towards a low-carbon society, which requires urgent and coordinated action; the increasing impact of our natural resources more wisely; and security challenges which are growing in scale and sophistication. Challenges such as caring for our aging population or reducing our dependence on fossil fuel do, however, also provide powerful opportunities to develop innovative products and services, creating growth and jobs in Europe. More precisely, the EU Grand Challenges are:
  • Health, demographic change and well-being
  • Food security, sustainable agriculture and biobased economy
  • Secure, clean and efficient energy
  • Smart, green and integrated transport
  • Climate action, resource efficiency and raw materials
  • Inclusive, innovative and secure societies
Europe’s universities and research institutions are seen as key providers of the cutting-edge knowledge needed to spur innovation. Yet, while Europe’s research base is among the most productive in the world, it lacks sufficient world-class excellence in exploiting groundbreaking research for economic prosperity. EU research and innovation funding will be key tools in promoting continent-wide excellence amongst Europe’s best researchers. Tackling societal challenges and strengthening the competitiveness of Europe’s industry will also require collaboration between the public and private sectors to exploit Europe’s potential to the fullest. Within its chosen profile, Maastricht University intends to be a key player in this effort for the region.

Contribution

Although the context in which we operate has changed (as described in the former chapter), Maastricht University’s contribution to the response to these opportunities and threats is still grounded in a deliberate choice for consistency and continuation of a line of development which was started in previous strategic programmes. However, we will place important accents in our strategic programme in response to these new developments.

Our answer to these new developments is based on our defining characteristics: PBL supported by ongoing innovation in education, a strong international focus and a multidisciplinary approach to both research and education. Building on this distinct profile, we strive to make a unique and outstanding contribution to the grand societal challenges of our time.

Taking our defining characteristics as a starting point, the new strategic programme sets out a series of strategic lines that will guide our institution for the coming period. In education, the successful Leading in Learning programme will continue to act as a catalyst for continuous improvement of our educational efforts. Leading in Learning is an umbrella programme with a number of pillars focused on quality and innovation in education and specific themes such as the international classroom and study success. In the context of this last theme, we aim to invest in selection and matching schemes to further reduce our first-year dropout rate. {Toelatingseisen en selectie{16 Our continued goal is for Maastricht University to acquire top positions in Dutch and European rankings. {Internationale concurrentiepositie{16 Since the university’s founding, research and education at Maastricht University have been thematic, multidisciplinary and inspired by societal themes. Maastricht University is unique because our approach is focused on a set of thematic priorities that are studied in a truly interdisciplinary fashion and at all relevant levels. From 2011 onwards, we are taking steps to consolidate multidisciplinary research focused on three broad themes:
  • Learning and Innovation
  • Quality of Life
  • Europe and a Globalising World

The three research themes will be addressed across the university and together with our primary partners. They will be clustered on three central Maastricht University campus areas and satellites: the Maastricht Inner-City Campus, the Maastricht Health Campus and the Chemelot Campus, and satellites in Venlo, Brussels and India. Both contract research and valorisation will be given a strong boost, not only to help the university reduce its dependence on declining government funding, but also to address grand societal challenges and expand into new markets. {Valorisatie{36 {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{36 The Contract Research Centre and a Maastricht University-wide support structure for valorisation will offer support in this regard. Valorisation will be a common theme for all three central campus activities, which are linked to the three central research themes. {Valorisatie{39

With regard to national and international cooperation, Maastricht University continues to be an international network university. At the heart of our strategy is network formation based on complementarities, added value, mutual understanding and entrepreneurship. This will help us to cope with the ever-changing profiles and challenges of the international higher education landscape, creating a global network profile that is firmly rooted in the Netherlands and Limburg. {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{66 The flexibility of such an approach is clearly better than merging institutions purely on the motive of regional proximity. Content and quality should always be the guiding principle.

Of course, the Maastricht University environment is not only international. After all, internationalisation and collaboration with partners abroad demand a simultaneously strong position and roots in one’s own region. Through our covenants and agreements on joint strategies with the Maastricht UMC+, provincial and local government authorities and Brainport 2020, we demonstrate our awareness of the university’s importance as a large employer with great significance for the region’s structure (and the strengthening of this structure). {Regionale samenwerking{62

Students and alumni

In the period from 2012 to 2016, we strive for a differentiated and high-quality student population, we will educate people who make a valuable contribution to society with an eye for the context that they work in, and we will consider it our societal responsibility to continually invest in a model that ensures that both the right students and the right alumni find themselves in the right place. {Valorisatie{52 Here are our specific goals:
  • Student intake is subject to selective admission and extensive guidance (‘matching and binding’) wherever needed in order to safeguard and enhance the quality of education. Alumni are the touchstones of that quality. {Studiebegeleiding{32 {Toelatingseisen en selectie{32
  • Each of the disciplinary study programmes allows sufficient room for a broader orientation to society and the future professional field. The variety of internships and career services will be further extended. {Aansluiting arbeidsmarkt{31
  • By the end of the new strategic period, international advisory committees will be working actively with the involvement of alumni. {Leven Lang Leren en Alumni{20
Our students form the heart of Maastricht University; they are customers, stakeholders and ambassadors in our educational context. We are, therefore, committed to improving the student experience. In the coming years, we will maintain and enhance the quality of the education on offer at Maastricht University. This includes a policy to successively apply a selective admission procedure in our study programmes wherever needed. {Toelatingseisen en selectie{17 Although the university already has high completion rates, we consider it our societal responsibility to continually invest in a model that ensures that the right students find themselves in the right place. Related to this is our goal of reducing first-year dropout rates even further. Ultimately, these developments will also help us to nurture a distinctive, high-quality student population. Where national legislation does not yet allow for selective admission, we will proceed with the implementation of various ‘matching and binding’ programmes. Pilots carried out to date can serve as examples for the university-wide introduction of selection, matching and binding programmes. {Toelatingseisen en selectie{100

All study programmes at Maastricht University are placed in the context of attractive career prospects for our students. The vast majority of our graduates, therefore, find attractive positions beyond the walls of the university, where their academic training allows them to make a genuine contribution. Next to accreditations and rankings, Maastricht University considers employment-related data like alumni satisfaction and attractiveness to employers to be important quality criteria. As in most universities, the number of students who pursue an academic career makes up a smaller portion of our population. For this reason, in addition to academics, Maastricht University pays a great deal of attention to the professional knowledge and skills that graduates will need in the labour market. The study programmes give equal weight to rigour in the sense of academic excellence and relevance in the context of application and use. In this way, we aim to train people who can make a valuable contribution to society. {Toelatingseisen en selectie{156 This requires that our alumni have not only the academic knowledge and skills required to carry in which they find themselves working. They know their field and carry out their duties in a professional manner. But given their academic basis, they also pay attention to the structural societal problems associated with their profession and are up to the challenge of devising solutions while maintaining a strong sense of integrity.

Naturally, the demands we make of our alumni need to be reflected in the setup of our education. After all, we use selection and matching techniques upon admission of the suitable student, and at the same time we provide a context to ensure that the right graduate ends up in the right place. Each of the academic programmes needs to allow sufficient scope for a broader orientation, for example, by offering one or more minors. Further, an overarching course selection and extra facilities will allow for students to follow extracurricular programmes and make use of services that contribute to their academic and social development. Good examples of this are the diverse and extensive number of internships, student guidance in the final study year (including career services) and the Studium Generale programme (especially the lecture series). {Brede bachelor{67 Students also organise lecture series and publish periodicals within the faculties. These activities will be intensified in the coming period.

As living proof of the quality of our education, our dedicated alumni network is growing rapidly and supports the university’s core business. Alumni are involved in international advisory committees for all programmes, which not only strengthens the bond with alumni, but also allows the university to benefit from their knowledge and experience with respect to the programme setup and to linking programmes to the professional experience. In the coming years, alumni will be even more involved in the university, for example, by their participation in regular study programmes. {Leven Lang Leren en Alumni{88

We want to share organisational responsibility with our students. We have therefore set up a policy to help more students find jobs within the university itself. Entrusting students with various work activities also means that the university as a whole is run by and with students to a greater extent. Given the success of the previous period in this regard, this process will be continued in the 2012 - 2016 period.

In order to be able to offer the highest quality education, the university has gradually been obliged to call for a greater personal contribution by students. In view of the reduction in direct government funding as well as the extra efforts being taken to offer study programmes that optimally prepare graduates to find suitable, well-paid jobs in the national or international labour market, new sources of funding are needed. We encourage our students to feel responsible for their own education and development. This not only means that they understand that they are expected to fully apply themselves in their education and maximise their own learning process, but also that they may be asked for an extra financial contribution as an investment in their future. {Externe fondsenwerving onderwijs{124

Education

Many educational challenges need to be met in this period. We will continue to focus on high-quality education by continuing to apply PBL in all study programmes and creating educational programmes that are at the top of Dutch rankings and in the top 10 in European rankings. We will continue to develop our international classroom and further innovate our education with student-centred, collaborative learning in a small-scale, inspiring learning environment as starting points. Here are our specific goals:
  • Maastricht University is the international university of the Netherlands and is well balanced between its Dutch, Euregional and international student population. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{21
  • The internationalisation of our student population is strengthened through the creation of an international classroom as the context for student learning. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{21
  • Study programmes rank among the top group in the Netherlands and Europe. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{12
  • The targets for annual student intake are as follows: bachelor’s in a range of 3,250 - 4,000 students, master’s in a range of 2,500 - 3,500 students and total enrolment in a range of 6,000 - 7,000 students.
  • All study programmes will have a good balance between Dutch, Euregional and international students in the international classroom. In addition, attention will be given to attracting students from outside the European Economic Area (EEA), with particular emphasis on the master’s segment. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{41
  • We will increase the number of full-time student equivalents (one student fte equalling 60 ECTS per year) in the university’s private and postgraduate course offerings from 750 in 2010 to 2,250 in 2016. {Externe fondsenwerving onderwijs{33
The quality of our educational programmes is a key feature of our strategy and our objectives are unchanged: all study programmes must be accredited and ranked in the top segment within the Netherlands and Europe. Study programmes will also be evaluated based on employment-related quality criteria (for example, satisfaction of alumni, and attractiveness for employers). {Kwaliteitszorg Onderwijs{55

Leading in Learning remains our commitment. Maastricht University profiles itself explicitly as a university that places great importance on educational quality and the use of PBL in all programmes. This means it is student-centred and focused on collaborative learning in a small-scale, inspiring environment, with the student’s learning process being developed and guided on the basis of real-life cases. We stand by this commitment to PBL as our key educational philosophy, while keeping in mind that educational concepts must be adapted to suit the dynamic environment. This is why we will invest further in educational innovation. Partly thanks to the university-wide Leading in Learning programme, attention is now focused on three essential aspects of PBL: defining and redefining the principles of PBL, innovating, and assessing the quality of the PBL process. When it comes to learning, Maastricht University will continue to be a world leader. Leading in Learning will thus remain a central strategic agenda for the coming period, with suitable financial and human resources made available. In the previous period, we chose two educational innovation priorities: research-based learning in the bachelor’s programmes and ‘learning and working’. The first is taking place within the context of the Sirius 1 programme, which has already been launched. The ‘learning and working’ initiative has resulted in a number of pilot projects in which existing eLearning technology is used to develop ‘blended learning’ arrangements, making it possible for part-time students and professionals to study in a flexible educational environment based on PBL principles. {ICT in onderwijs{44 In addition, the Sirius 2 programme, aimed at challenging master’s students to collaborate in multidisciplinary projects with peers, staff and stakeholders outside the university, will start at the same time as the new strategic programme. The university has also opted to offer students more freedom of choice (for example, to follow minors at other faculties).

One of our most striking developments has been the creation of the ‘international classroom’. We are convinced that working in tutorial groups with students of different origins, different cultural backgrounds, and thus with distinct contributions to offer the group is of great value to the learning process. Exploring problems from different perspectives and backgrounds generates a unique added value in the sense that students are confronted with different ways of thinking and different viewpoints that would remain unexplored if the tutorial group were more homogenous in composition. Students who are educated in the environment of a genuinely international classroom are best prepared to work in a rapidly internationalising and globalising labour market for highly-educated professionals. The aim of our policy is thus to create an educational climate in which students can learn from one another and gain experience in different social and cultural skills. In the coming period, we, therefore, will differentiate the composition of the tutorial groups in terms of nationality, gender, competences and other qualities, more than has been the case to date. This will require investments in the further internationalisation of the student population, with a view to achieving a sound balance between the admission of students from the Netherlands and abroad. When properly applied, differentiation of this kind can help to increase the quality of education even further. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{222

The small scale of our education is one of our hallmarks. Even with a growing student population in virtually all of our programmes, we have succeeded in maintaining this approach. The recipe for success in maintaining this small scale even within largescale programmes is communication with students combined with strongly committed educators. In the coming plan period, we will evaluate whether we can improve the quality still further by subsuming largescale programmes into small, manageable schools or colleges (in the vein of university colleges, for example) where there is a strong sense of academic community. {Onderwijsintensiteit{95

Along with profiling the format of our programmes, we will develop our unique profile based on its content. The central role given to international and European programmes within Maastricht University is underpinned by the specific knowledge and expertise that the university has accrued over the years, the profile of the university as an international organisation, as well as the image of Maastricht as a city in the heart of Europe and the birthplace of the European Union. Specific programmes such as International Business, European Studies, European Law and European Public Health are examples of international jewels in Maastricht University’s educational crown. And we continue to seek further internationalisation of education through a range of measures that are relatively straightforward to implement, such as increasing internship opportunities outside as well as within the EEA, attracting more guest lecturers from abroad and supporting internationalisation activities (and simulations thereof) by students and student organisations with an academic component. The international programmes will be strengthened where possible and aligned with existing or soon-to-be-established multidisciplinary research programmes. Also, partly in this context of internationalisation, we will examine the scope for the development of interfaculty programmes. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{190

In the last period, we began taking various steps to reinforce and expand the sciences at Maastricht University. This process has led to the launch of the Maastricht Science Programme in 2011 and the launch of two related master’s programmes and associated research institutes in Biobased Materials and Systems Biology. We are confident that our collaboration with the business sector and government authorities will enable us to accelerate this development of the sciences. Priorities for this period will be the development of joint programmes with leading institutes abroad and participation in the Erasmus Mundus programme. These initiatives should help to promote quality and give rise to an even more attractive education portfolio for both students and staff. {Joint Degree{44 Given the existing programme selection, however, it is unlikely that new programmes will be developed and introduced in the new plan period at the same pace as in previous years. Rather, we will focus on consolidation with an emphasis on quality. From the viewpoint of efficiency, transparency and profiling, especially in cases where new study programmes are launched, we will need to consider carefully whether existing programmes can be integrated or discontinued.

The faculties also offer various programmes and courses in the field of post-initial education. Forms of education that can be classed under the banner ‘life-long learning’ are among the core tasks of the university, not least for our alumni. Professionals need the opportunity for further training, which Maastricht University is extremely well equipped to offer. In the coming plan period, we intend to further strengthen the offer of post-initial education and at the same time enhance the visibility of the various programmes. {Postinitieel onderwijs{82

A summer school will be launched during the new plan period. This will offer programmes which can help prospective students to orient themselves towards a particular programme at Maastricht University and rectify any potential deficiencies, allowing them to transition smoothly into a master’s programme. This should help us to attract students from abroad and thus strengthen the international classroom. {Voorlichting{59 {Aansluiting toeleverend onderwijs{59

Finally, in the coming years a great deal of extra attention will be paid to improving and ensuring the quality of education. To this end, comprehensive management information will be made available in a timely manner. Further, the education quality cycle will be given a fixed and prominent place on the managerial agenda by way of an annual, universitywide seminar at which the faculties can present their findings with respect to quality assurance and measures to promote educational quality. In this way, we will be able to learn from the best practices. As a hallmark for our overall educational quality, we will apply for institutional accreditation from the Dutch-Flemish Accreditation Organisation (NVAO). {Kwaliteitszorg Onderwijs{112

Research

Maastricht University will contribute to challenges in research where there will be both opportunities as well as threats. As described in this chapter, we will conduct core research which is ranked among the top in the Netherlands and in Europe; we will strive for a further increase in both indirect government as well as third-party funding; we will strengthen multidisciplinary, interfaculty research in three areas: Learning and Innovation, Quality of Life, and Europe and a Globalising World. Here are our specific goals:
  • Our research profile is characterised by focus and interdisciplinary cooperation and is linked to our education strengths. {Profilering en zwaartepuntvorming{17
  • Our research programmes are recognised and ranked among the top in the Netherlands and in Europe. {Internationale concurrentiepositie{16
  • We will acquire more Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) funding with the goal of acquiring four to five percent of the national share. {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{24
  • New research programmes will be developed in close collaboration with the business sector and other knowledge institutes, resulting in a substantial increase in contract research funding. {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{26
  • A substantial part of every academic’s research time will be financed by external funding over a five-year period. {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{18
  • Our commitment is to realise more than 250 PhD defences per year by 2016.
Dutch universities have an international reputation as research universities. Like its sister institutions, our university has reached a top position in research despite its short history. Given that we have significantly less research funding than other Dutch universities, this achievement represents a huge success. The policy, initiated in previous years, calls for a long-term commitment to achieving focus and mass in top research within centres of excellence. This policy extends into the new strategic development period. {Profilering en zwaartepuntvorming{32

Despite the successes of recent years, we also need to pay continued attention to increasing Maastricht University’s share of indirect government and contract research funding as well as expanding our valorisation activities. As a focused research university, Maastricht University can only be active in a selected number of fields within NWO. Since reinforcing our position with the NWO is a longterm commitment, our goal is to acquire at least four to five percent of the yearly available NWO funding by 2016 (with a long-term target of six percent). To this end, and in line with our efforts to acquire funds from the European Research Council, we are making use of proven instruments like the Maastricht University grant scheme. Given that Maastricht University’s performance in securing indirect government funding needs to be further improved, we will have to pay extra attention to this matter in the 2012-2016 period by recruiting talent, coaching potential NWO laureates, drawing up a strategy for acquiring EU research funds and critically evaluating the past performance of candidates nominated for professorial appointments. Furthermore, we will explore possibilities for expanding the scope of the NWO programmes that we intend to target. {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{193

From 2012 onwards, we are starting to take steps to consolidate multidisciplinary research focused on three distinct themes. These themes will be addressed in a differential manner, ranging from fundamental, curiosity-driven research, to applied, innovation-oriented research. The aim is to contribute to solving ‘grand challenges’, that is, the societal problems addressed within the themes. Examples include green food, European security, migration, integration, and health and welfare from a transcultural and historical perspective. The themes also foster research geared towards the innovationdriven top-sectors, as identified by the Dutch Minister of Economic Affairs and Innovation. Beyond these designated themes, we intend to promote more crossover collaboration by way of concrete, short-term incentives. The emphasis on these three ‘grand’ themes helps to give direction to the development of our research, but at the same time allows room for new, groundbreaking and innovative research, be it fundamental or applied. {Profilering en zwaartepuntvorming{145

In the first year of the new plan period, we will set up quality assurance programmes for the study programmes and provide guidance specific to the implementation of the graduate schools. In developing themes for PhD research, the societal relevance of the subject will be an explicit point of attention, although care will be taken to avoid a situation in which we only support research questions with societal relevance that can be demonstrated in advance. {Graduate School{75 By definition, the university also provides scope for research that is fuelled purely by curiosity. Aside from our targets for indirect government and contract research funding in terms of percentages of the faculty budgets and the total university budget, requirements will also be set in 2016 for earning power at the level of individual academics. Concretely, this will mean that a substantial part of every academic’s research time is to be financed externally over a five-year period. {Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek{62

Valorisation

Contribution to challenges set for valorisation for the 2012 - 2016 period will have our special attention, in response to future emphasising of the utilisation of research outcomes. Therefore, we will further develop major initiatives together with our partners in the Brainport 2020 area and the Euregion, such as Chemelot, Maastricht Health Campus (including Brains Unlimited), the sciences, the Inner-City Campus and the campus satellites (for example, Agro-food in Venlo).We will sustain or increase the number of spin-off companies and we will develop a view on societal valorisation and accompanying policies. {Valorisatie{91

The three central themes (Learning and Innovation, Quality of Life, and Europe and a Globalising World) will be addressed across the university and together with our primary partners; they will be clustered on three central Maastricht University campus areas. Learning and Innovation will be a crossover theme that binds all campus areas together in the true sense of our motto, ‘leading in learning’. In addition, all three campus satellites will have a specific focus in Maastricht University’s combined research landscape described on page 12.

In addition to the campus developments, both contract research and knowledge valorisation will be given a strong boost, not only to help the university reduce its dependence on declining government funding, but also to expand into new markets. The Contract Research Centre and a Maastricht Universitywide support structure for valorisation will offer support in this regard. Valorisation will be a common theme for all three campus activities, which are linked to the three overarching research themes defined in this strategic programme. The intensified collaboration with the business sector both on and beyond the campuses will also result in an increase in activities related to contract research funding, certainly by 2016. This also applies to economic valorisation stemming from the university and the Maastricht UMC+. Stimulated by the accelerated development of the Maastricht Health Campus and the Chemelot Campus, the number of spin-off companies to be established will at least double from the current average of two per year. More generally, major efforts will be made during the new plan period to valorise our education and research, which will give rise to a substantial source of income for all faculties. To foster this, valorisation objectives will become standard elements in individual performance agreements and assessments. {Valorisatie{204

Next to economic valorisation, we are also responsible for the societal valorisation of the activities carried out at the university. This can take many forms and should become a fixed component in performance assessments for academic staff. Maastricht University will develop a strategic view on societal valorisation and set accompanying policies. In addition, particular efforts will be made to enhance the university’s science communication; this will include encouraging the organisation of academic conferences. {Valorisatie{73

Staff

For the 2012-2016 period, Maastricht University will contribute to challenges that are important for our staff. As will be described in this chapter, Maastricht University will position itself as an attractive employer, focusing on quality of staff, reflecting the international character of Maastricht University and further strengthening the academic community. Here are our specific goals:
  • The Mobilising Minds programme guides our human resource management (HRM) policy, with a great deal of attention paid to opportunities for further professionalization of the teaching and research staff. {Personeelsbeleid{29
  • The quality of the professorial appointment procedure will be further improved. {Personeelsbeleid{11
  • The proportion of female professors and international staff will increase substantially. {Diversiteit{11
The university continues to be an attractive employer. This is one of the factors underlying the development of our multi-year HRM policy, as reflected in the Mobilising Minds programme. In the coming period, we intend to stick to this course. The quality of our staff will thus receive extra attention, in the forms of tailored teaching and research training for staff members. {Personeelsbeleid{62 We aim to facilitate teaching careers and to deploy staff members to the areas where they best flourish. The first step in this process is the Basic Teaching Qualification (BKO) initiative, which will be followed in the new plan period by a programme for further professionalization of the teaching staff, especially in PBL. {Didaktische vaardigheden docenten{53 Also in the coming period, we intend to evaluate the university’s appointment procedure for professors with the aim of identifying how to improve the quality of this procedure both formally and materially. {Personeelsbeleid{16 Related to this, we will also focus on achieving a more balanced gender ratio for Maastricht University professors. The policy of appointing more visiting professors has also proven its worth and will thus become standard practice. The percentage of international staff will also increase through 2015. {Diversiteit{43

Maastricht University is synonymous with a learning community of researchers, tutors and students. We will conduct further research to discover how we can promote academic debate between researchers across the boundaries of the different faculties.

As with bachelor’s and master’s alumni, in the new plan period we will set up a registration system for our PhD graduates, which will track their entry to the labour market. In addition, the directors of the graduate schools will organise an annual, universitywide seminar for the exchange of good practices in the PhD candidate policy. {Graduate School{56

Governance

The Maastricht University management is equally balanced between central strategy and decentralised responsibility. Education, research and service to society take place within faculties, under final responsibility of the deans. Targets for those goals will be formulated as part of the Balanced Scorecard. These targets will form the framework for assessing the performance of the faculties and the university as a whole.

Teaching, research and support services are located within the faculties, with support services shared as much as possible. The dean is ultimately responsible for all aspects of running a faculty. The primary role of the Executive Board is to facilitate the faculties so that they can carry out their tasks as optimally as possible. The Balanced Scorecard, which sets out the consolidated target figures for the new plan period, will be filled out according to the targets set in this strategic programme. These figures are also set per faculty or service centre on the basis of mutual consultation, and form the framework for assessing the performance of the faculties and the university. The Balanced Scorecard is addressed in the semiannual consultations between the Executive Board and the deans.

Maastricht University will redefine the collaboration with the azM within the Maastricht UMC+. We will work together with the Maastricht UMC+ to create a unique structure within one academic family to carry out an integrated strategy. Based on the history of Maastricht University, the interaction between the university and academic hospital requires a Maastricht-specific solution that is in accordance with the broad themes defined earlier. This will also ensure the success of campus activities in Maastricht, Sittard-Geleen and beyond. It will also make us even more competitive in national projects such as the top sector initiatives. {Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen{96

The first year of the new plan period will be spent following up on the evaluation results concerning the collaboration between Maastricht University and the azM in the Maastricht UMC+. These results should reveal how we can take this collaboration forward. In this effort, we will examine not only managerial aspects, but also whether the collaboration has met the partners’ expectations with respect to better quality and integration of teaching, research and patient care within the Maastricht UMC+. {Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen{78

Operations

Maastricht University will respond to operational challenges in a number of ways. As described in this chapter, we will make operational processes as student-centred as possible; structure the supporting organisation in such a way that employees are enabled to optimally make use of one another’s competences; continue streamlining the supporting services, resulting in a ‘lean and friendly’ organisation; follow the ‘English-unless’ principle; improve information management; and renew the electronic working and learning environment.

Our Leading in Learning mission also applies to operational management and the importance of further developing the university as a learning organisation. This entails a culture of respect for one another’s professionalism in terms of both academic achievements and competences. Just as the academic debate needs to be carried out across faculty boundaries, we need to capitalise on one another’s competences when it comes to operational management.

It is important that Maastricht University’s studentcentred approach permeates all of our various operational management processes: all processes need to be geared towards and assessed on this basis. These efforts will be accelerated in the coming years by STUDENT, a university-wide programme that is currently being developed. At the same time, we will also continue our internationalisation efforts, starting with the basic principle of ‘English unless’.

Having a student-focused learning and professional organisation will be an important success criterion as we further develop the university. Due to changes in government funding and increasing national and international competition, we face the challenge of adapting our sources of funding over the coming years to the new landscape. Government funding will be increasingly complemented by added focus on other sources such as tuition fees, contract research, sales of intellectual property, charitable fundraising and funding from research councils both at home and abroad. {Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen{83 In addition to significantly increasing the university’s earning power, we will strive to arrange our support services so that they can be characterised as ‘lean and friendly’. We will also continue streamlining the organisation in the 2012 - 2016 period, with the aim of increasing the quality of the services while reducing their share of the total expenditure. {Efficiency en effectiviteit{58

The focus on performance and quality calls for adequate provision of management information. In recent years, the university has invested substantially in new ICT systems. It is important that the information saved in these systems is available in the formats needed for accreditation processes, peer review and other functions. This will be realised in 2011-2012 by way of the BE-INFORMED programme. In subsequent years, we will focus on upgrading the electronic work and learning environment, which will include setting up a new research information system. {Informatiemanagement{85

The focus on performance and quality also translates into elaborated Balanced Scorecards for the service centres and the Maastricht University Office.

In connection with the introduction of a new university funding breakdown for 2012 and subsequent years, for which the external funding model forms the starting point, the system of serviceprovision agreements (DVOs) will also be critically examined. Revision of this system should ensure that the faculties are involved in DVOs which they can actually influence. {Efficiency en effectiviteit{55

During the plan period, the Green Office, launched in 2010, will develop into a common platform with the aim to ensure that sustainability features as a theme within the academic programmes. It will also strongly promote sustainability within the university’s operational management processes. {Duurzaamheid{53

International network university

Last but not least, development toward becoming an international network university is an important accent to this strategic programme. In this last chapter, we will address how we aspire to reinforce internationalisation through target country policy and other means; we will join or initiate processes of international and national network formation; and we will strengthen regional cooperation and regional economic structure. Here are our specific goals:
  • Maastricht University will be a global network university, firmly rooted in Limburg and offering a gateway to the Netherlands for high-quality students and staff.
  • Maastricht University will make efforts to set up joint and double degrees with network partners within and outside the Netherlands. {Joint Degree{20
  • Maastricht University is working towards the development of a European Statute that will give a number of European universities a specific legal framework for international collaboration. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{26
  • The university’s strategic development is characterised by careful alignment and partnerships with other knowledge institutions, governments, the business sector and initiatives like Brainport 2020. It is an attractive regional, Euregional, national and international partner. {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{34
Over the last few years, we have made strong progress in terms of internationalisation. This policy is set to be continued, for example, by way of a well-considered target country strategy. Special emphasis will be given to the BRIC countries such as India and China. Specific manifestations of this include maintaining a physical presence abroad in various capacities, ranging from the Maastricht Educational Research Centre in Bangalore to our premises in Brussels and the presence of a teaching staff member at the embassy in Riyadh. Like the general recruitment strategy, these ‘antennas’ will be monitored critically and continuously. {Opkomende economieen{98

The target country strategy involves more than just student exchange. Maastricht University activities in India have already proven that they can help strengthen and extend our research affiliations with partners abroad. In addition, they offer opportunities for us to further pave the way as a university that is ‘leading in learning’ internationally, and that is also capable of marketing educational concepts and programmes worldwide. {Opkomende economieen{64

The strategy for 2012 - 2016 compared with a vision of the university world in 2030 shows how important it is for Maastricht University to work hard to join in the process of international network formation. In 2020, the universities that attract students from all corners of the world will be known not only for their excellence in teaching and research, but also for the global network in which they participate. Those distinguished by their strong network will have a rich variety of degrees, particularly joint degrees and double degrees in the master’s and PhD phases, and thus offer students wide-ranging international experience. It is only fitting that we work towards this vision in the coming years with respect to joint and double degrees as well as exchange programmes with a limited number of partner universities. This internationalisation policy will increase the opportunities for Maastricht University students to follow part of their programmes abroad, and for the university to receive more students from abroad who, in turn, contribute to the development of the international classroom. {Joint Degree{175

We thus intend to continue building up a consortium of like-minded universities. At the same time, Maastricht University will promote the development of a European Statute that will allow a limited number of European universities to work together with ease across national borders within the same legal framework. {Internationalisering Onderwijs{48

The heart of our strategy is network formation based on complementarities, added value, mutual understanding and entrepreneurship. This will help us to cope with the ever-changing profiles and challenges of the international higher education landscape, creating a global network profile that is firmly rooted in the Netherlands and Limburg. The flexibility of such an approach is clearly preferential to merging institutions purely on the motive of regional proximity. Content and quality should always be the guiding principle. {Nationale en internationale samenwerking{77

The Maastricht University and Maastricht UMC+ environments are, of course, not only international; we need to define our national and regional positions as well. After all, internationalisation and collaboration with partners abroad demand a simultaneously strong position and roots in one’s own region. Through our covenants and agreements on joint strategies with the Maastricht UMC+ and government authorities, we demonstrate our awareness of the university’s importance as a large employer with great significance for the region’s structure (and the strengthening of this structure). The figures speak for themselves: €800 million in turnover is directly attributable to the activities of Maastricht University and the Maastricht UMC+. The total number of employees stands at 9,000; the number of students, including PhD candidates, amounts to more than 15,000. Studies, like a recent report by the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, show that our students are responsible for an average expenditure of €25,000 per year. Maastricht University and the Maastricht UMC+ are thus indisputably vital branches of Limburg’s economy. {Regionale samenwerking{166

Maastricht University’s investments in the development of the Maastricht Health Campus will further boost the region’s economic structure. This goes hand in hand with the foundation of the CHEMaterial Campus, where Maastricht University has started teaching and research activities. We are working on the Capital of Culture project together with the Province of Limburg, the City of Maastricht and other knowledge institutes like Hogeschool Zuyd. The academic education in supply chain management and health food innovation at Campus Venlo builds on our strengths in this area. {Regionale samenwerking{86 In addition, Maastricht University seeks collaboration with knowledge institutes in the region: we already have far-reaching cooperation with Hasselt, and are further strengthening our strategic alliances with Aachen and Liège. {Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen{30 At the same time, we are working more closely with other regional knowledge institutions on projects like Brainport 2020. These partnerships, established bottom-up and supported top-down, are both desirable and necessary, not only because capitalising on one another’s complementary strengths means that we are better able to do what we are good at, but also because it allows us to make a bigger contribution to the economic development of the region (for example, by producing high-quality knowledge workers and stimulating spin-off companies). This is also in line with recent developments in Dutch higher education policy, such as the Veerman report and the proposed Strategic Agenda for Higher Education, Research and Science by the Minister of Education. Maastricht University will, naturally, also continue collaborating with the private business sector. {Samenwerking met bedrijfsleven{128 Finally, the collaboration with other institutions will help us to reshape and optimise our educational and research profiles. In all these forms of collaboration and partnerships, however, it is important that we as a university do not lose our individuality.

Concluding words

The new strategic programme builds on the strength of our university, its staff and its students and lays the foundation for further developing the strengths of Maastricht University and its unique profile in the Dutch University landscape. We are confident that with the completion of the current program, our university will be an even better place to work and study. In the true spirit of its young history, our university will continue to be a learning organisation, responding to the needs of the region and the country as a whole, but also aware of its special role in cross-border developments and internationalisation. ‘Inspired by quality’ is, therefore, not only an important reminder of the milestones that we have achieved over the last 36 years but also forms the core of our mission and a guiding principle for all future activities.


----------------

Analyse strategich programma Maastricht University 2012-2016

In onderstaand overzicht staan de onderwerpen uit het strategich programma gerangschikt in volgorde van het aantal woorden gewijd is aan het beschrijven en uitwerken van het onderwerp. Onderliggende aanname is dat er meer woorden gebruikt worden voor bestuurlijk belangrijke onderwerpen.

Een decielscores geeft aan in welk deciel (10% categorie) het aantal woorden valt. Een decielscore van 1 wil zeggen dat het aantal woorden binnen het eerste deciel valt: de laagste 10% van het aantal woorden dat aan een onderwerp besteedt wordt. Een decielscore van 6 wil zeggen dat het aantal gebruikte woorden tussen de 50%-60% ligt van het aantal woorden dat maximaal gebruikt wordt om een onderwerp te beschrijven.

Onderwerp
# woorden
% woorden
decielscore
Regionale samenwerking
877
12,91
10
Internationalisering Onderwijs
716
10,54
10
Valorisatie
685
10,09
10
Nationale en internationale samenwerking
502
7,39
10
Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek
444
6,54
9
Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen
398
5,86
9
Profilering en zwaartepuntvorming
368
5,42
9
Opkomende economieen
360
5,30
8
Toelatingseisen en selectie
321
4,73
8
Joint Degree
239
3,52
8
Samenwerking met bedrijfsleven
222
3,27
7
Kwaliteitszorg Onderwijs
167
2,46
7
Externe fondsenwerving onderwijs
157
2,31
7
Personeelsbeleid
145
2,14
6
Graduate School
131
1,93
6
Efficiency en effectiviteit
127
1,87
6
Leven Lang Leren en Alumni
108
1,59
5
Informatiemanagement
99
1,46
5
Onderwijsintensiteit
95
1,40
5
Postinitieel onderwijs
82
1,21
4
Brede bachelor
67
0,99
4
Internationale concurrentiepositie
65
0,96
4
Aansluiting toeleverend onderwijs
59
0,87
3
Voorlichting
59
0,87
3
Diversiteit
54
0,80
3
Didaktische vaardigheden docenten
53
0,78
2
Duurzaamheid
53
0,78
2
ICT in onderwijs
44
0,65
2
Studiebegeleiding
32
0,47
1
Aansluiting arbeidsmarkt
31
0,46
1
Rendement en uitval
21
0,31
1
Ondernemerschap
10
0,15
1

6791
100


In onderstaand overzicht staan de onderwerpen uit het strategich programma gerangschikt binnen alle strategische ondewerpen van het Hoger Onderwijs. In alle kolommen worden decielscores vermeldt. De decielscores in de kolom "WO" zijn tot stand gekomen door het aantal woorden dat gewijd is aan hetzelfde onderwerp in alle WO-instellingsplannen op te tellen en vervolgens in te delen in het bijhorende deciel. De decielscores in de kolom "OCW" zijn tot stand gekomen door het aantal woorden dat aan een onderwerp gewijd is in het Hoofdlijnenakkoord op te tellen bij het aantal woorden dat eraan is gewijd in de Strategische Agenda van het Ministerie. De optelsom is vervolgens ingedeeld in het bijhorende deciel.

Onderwijs
UM
OCW
WO
1.1. Rendement en uitval
1
5
9
1.1.1. Aansluiting toeleverend onderwijs
3
3
3
1.1.2. Voorlichting
3
9
3
1.1.3. Brede bachelor
4
7
3
1.1.4. Studiebegeleiding
1

5
1.1.5. Ambitieus onderwijs

8
7
1.1.5.1. Toelatingseisen en selectie
8
8
5
1.1.5.2. Onderwijsintensiteit
5
7
3
1.1.5.3. Docentkwaliteit

1
1
1.1.5.3.1. Academisering docenten

6
1
1.1.5.3.2. Didaktische vaardigheden docenten
2
5
5
1.1.5.3.3. Werkveld ervaring docenten



1.1.5.4. Diversiteit

3
7
1.1.5.4.1. Associate Degree

6

1.1.5.4.2. Professional Doctorate


1
1.1.5.4.3. Excellent onderwijs

6
7
1.1.5.4.4. Academisering Onderwijs

2
6
1.1.5.4.5. Graduate School
6
2
8
1.1.5.4.6. Joint Degree
8

2
1.1.5.4.7. Postinitieel onderwijs
4
4
7
1.1.5.4.8. Leven Lang Leren en Alumni
5
9
9
1.1.6. Flexibiliteit en Maatwerk


2
1.2. ICT in onderwijs
2

6
1.3. Internationalisering Onderwijs
10
4
10
1.4. Werving excellente studenten

1
5
1.5. Samenwerking met kennisinstellingen
9
5
9
1.6. Aansluiting arbeidsmarkt
1
8
6
1.7. Externe fondsenwerving onderwijs
7

5
1.8. Kwaliteitszorg Onderwijs
7
10
7





Onderzoek
UM
OCW
WO
2.1. Praktijkgericht onderzoek

7

2.2. Profilering en zwaartepuntvorming
9
10
10
2.3. Internationale concurrentiepositie
4
7
8
2.4. Werving excellente onderzoekers

1
8
2.5. Diversiteit en Differentiatie
3
10
4
2.6. ICT in onderzoek

2
2
2.7. Ontwikkelen Onderzoeksinfrastructuur

2
4
2.8. Externe fondsenwerving onderzoek
9
9
10
2.9. Kwaliteitszorg Onderzoek

4
6





Valorisatie
UM
OCW
WO
3.0. Valorisatie
10
10
10
3.1. Samenwerking met bedrijfsleven
7
6
4
3.2. Regionale samenwerking
10

10
3.3. Nationale en internationale samenwerking
10
9
9
3.4. Ondernemerschap
1
4
8





Bedrijfsvoering
UM
OCW
WO
4.1. Campus


9
4.2. Duurzaamheid
2

6
4.3. Informatiemanagement
5

4
4.4. Efficiency en effectiviteit
6

8
4.5. Personeelsbeleid
6
3
10
4.6. Onderwijskundig Leiderschap

1
2
4.7. Financial Control


2
4.8. Nieuwe werken


3





Trends
UM
OCW
WO
5.1. Topsport


1
5.2. Universiteitsbibliotheek


2
5.3. Opkomende economieen
8

4



In onderstaande tabel is een overzicht opgenomen van de mate van samenhang van het strategische programma van de UM met de plannen van alle andere betrokkenen. De analyses zijn gebaseerd op het aantal woorden dat besteedt wordt aan het beschrijven en uitwerken van de strategische onderwerpen. Waarden tussen 0,5 en 0,7 duiden op een middelmatige correlatie en zijn aangegeven met 1 ster (*). Waarden groter dan 0,7 duiden op een hoge correlatie en zijn aangegeven met 2 sterren (**).


Maastricht University
Avans Hogeschool
0,32
Fontys Hogeschool
-0,11
Haagse Hogeschool
0,29
Hogeschool van Arnhem en Nijmegen
0,22
Hanzehogeschool Groningen
0,42
Hogeschool Leiden
0,02
Hogeschool Utrecht
0,21
Hogeschool van Amsterdam
0,42
Hogeschool Zeeland
0,29
InHolland Hogeschool
-0,02
NHL Hogeschool
0,16
Saxion
0,59 *
Christelijke Hogeschool Windesheim
0,17
Erasmus Univerversiteit Rotterdam
0,6 *
Radboud Universiteit
0,27
Rijksuniversiteit Grongingen
0,53 *
TU Delft
0,32
TU Eindhoven
0,46
Universiteit Leiden
0,32
Maastricht University
1 **
Universiteit Twente
0,29
Universiteit Utrecht
0,61 *
Universiteit van Amsterdam
0,53 *
Universiteit van Tilburg
0,62 *
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
0,41
Wageningen University & Research centre
0,55 *
HBO instellingen
0,38
WO instellingen
0,73 **
OCW (1)
0,33
HO (2)
0,66 *

(1) Strategische Agenda inclusief hoofdlijnenakkoord VSNU
(2) HBO- en WO instellingen plus Strategische Agenda OCW inclusief hoofdlijnenakkoorden





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88x31.png U kunt als volgt naar deze bron verwijzen:
TeWinkel, W., & Juist, N. (2012). Strategie Hoger Onderwijs Nederland 2012.
Beschikbaar via http://www.strategie-ho.nl